Reverse Plank: Exercise Guide & Tips

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Reverse Plank: Flip your plank for an intense core workout

Why reverse plank? Technically this is a modified version of a back bridge. The reverse plank exercise works in much the same way as the plank exercise, except that it is the other way around. This hold shifts the brunt of the resistance from primarily the anterior muscles, to mostly the posterior.

Reverse plank stretches the entire front side of your body as it strengthens the entire back side. You’ll release the muscles of your chest and belly, as well as your hip flexors and ankles, in a full reverse plank. These areas can grow excessively tight on runners, for example. Meanwhile, your back muscles and hamstrings will have to work to hold you up.

How to do the reverse plank exercise?

In order to perform this somehow forgotten core exercise efficiently and safely follow these steps:

  1. To approach the reverse plank, sit on the floor with your legs extended and your heels pressing down.
  2. From there, place your hands at your sides, palms down and arms straight.
  3. Push down with your hands as you lift your hips up.
  4. Ultimately, we’d like to have a straight line from the shoulder to the hip to the heel, just like the classic forearm plank. However, this time we are facing the sky not the ground and our main stabilizers switch from the abdominals to the lower back and glutes.
  5. Keep this posture until the desired amount of lime passes.
reverse plank core exercise

reverse plank exercise

Key performance points for reverse plank

Here are some helpful hints (key elements to consider) on how to perform the reverse plank exercise safely and effectively.

  1. Sit down on the floor with your legs straight out in front of you and your hands placed directly underneath your shoulders with your fingertips facing your butt.
  2. Press into your palms and feet, and lift your hips up so that your body creates a straight line from your shoulders to your feet. Push into your big toes, and keep your inner thighs active and engaged to help maintain the hold.
  3. Let your head fall back slightly, and look straight up. Or choose another position for your neck and head that is relaxing.

Common mistakes

Major mistakes include:

  • sagging hips;
  • wrists not in line with shoulders;
  • bent elbows;

Muscles Engaged in Reverse Plank

When you perform any plank exercise, you work all of the muscles that make up your core and gain all of the benefits that come with building strong core.

Along with that, this plank version strengthens the gluteus, hamstrings, lower back, wrists, and inner thighs while stretching the chest and shoulders.

Exercise Variations

Reverse table pose

Bending the knees to 90 degrees, with feet directly underneath, lessens the workload. This is often called reverse table pose.

Reverse table pose

Reverse table pose

  • Sit down on the floor with your knees bent and your hands placed directly underneath your shoulders with your fingertips facing your butt.
  • Press into your palms and feet, and lift your hips up so that your body creates a straight line from your knee to your shoulder in a table position.
  • Let your head fall back slightly, and look straight up.

Replacement exercises

Try these other core exercises.

If you think your core is strong enough, it’s time to discover the three most efficient core exercises you’ll ever try – real core killer exercises.

Closing thoughts about the reverse planks

The reverse plank is a worthy addition to your core routine, and is a good stepping stone to the more difficult glute-ham plank. However, reverse planks are often forgotten when it comes to core training. Most people focus on working the muscles they can see on the front side of the body. Therefore, reverse planks should be an important part of your core training routine because they strengthen the posterior chain. The posterior chain is made up of muscles in the back side of your body, including the gluteus, hamstrings, and lower back. These muscles are important in daily life activities, such as jumping, running, sitting down, and standing up. Therefore, it’s easy to conclude that the classic forearm plank (front plank) and reverse plank are of equal importance for building stronger and healthier body.

About Author

Hey! My name is Kruno, and I'm the owner and author of Bodybuilding Wizard. I started this website back in late 2014, and it has been my pet project ever since. My goal is to help you learn proper weight training and nutrition principles so that you can get strong and build the physique of your dreams!

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